A Tiger in the Kitchen: A Memoir of Food and Family by Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan Book Review

Tiger in the Kitchen cover

In her food memoir, A Tiger in the Kitchen, Cheryl Tan reconnects with her Singaporean family and culture after a devastating job loss. Tan spends the next year visiting her aunties to learn the ins and outs of family recipes and lore. As a child, Tan was kept out of the kitchen. As a first-born, tiger child, she was put on the path of education and financial success — she was encouraged to leave behind traditional female domestic responsibilities, but as a result lost pieces of her heritage that were tied to the kitchen.

“Because of recent generations of women just like me who were intent on avoiding cooking, some of these recipes are slowly fading from the culinary awareness.”

I can relate to Tan in this way. Most of the family and food lore resided in my great-grandmother, Nanny, who never wrote anything down. I only spent fleeting weeks with her over the summer. I soaked up as much as I could, but there are some recipes and family stories that are lost to me now that she is gone. In the recipes section Tan points out, “Quantities aren’t exact. My aunts don’t use a recipe, and they laughed at me the first ten times I asked them for this one.” I try to be better for my kids so they will not lose out on my food knowledge, but for somebody who cooks by taste, it is difficult to record exacting quantities. Sometimes it is just about the look, the feel, the smell in my kitchen.

On the pineapple tarts…”I’d enjoyed them while eating them, sure, but I’d never considered making them, having dismissed knowing how to cook as one of those things that weakened you as  female. And yet there my grandmother had been, cooking with a ferocity that I should be so lucky to have.”

Tan’s memoir is very approachable in language and experience. It is the story of a person of two cultures, two food stories, but it is also a story of generational knowledge. She takes the reader along as she fumbles through learning her family’s ways in the kitchen. She also recognizes how food is a conduit for so many other aspects of our lives. “These dishes had long ceased to be just food, having been wrapped up for years in the tangled mysticism of my family, of its history.”

I also appreciated Cheryl Tan’s attention to history. Each chapter includes some nuggets of Singapore’s rich culture. She often provides these details alongside her personal experience like in her chapter that discusses the Festival of Hungry Ghosts, or Moon Festival where moon cakes were staples. Tan describes her penchant for just buying the moon cakes in a store and her hesitancy to try the family recipe with yam, but then realizes what she had been missing by not engaging in the family practice of preparing the food for these festivals. 

As her year of food exploration comes to a close, Tan realizes, “Each time I went back to New York…I was returning with more and more of my true home. Bits of my family, dishes that I now knew how to make.” What could have been a devastating time after her job loss turned into an excavation of her own true self, and a kindling of familial relationships far more valuable than a salary.

Home Cooking: A Writer in the Kitchen by Laurie Colwin

Home Cooking cover

“No one who cooks cooks alone. Even at her most solitary, a cook in the kitchen is surrounded by generations of cooks past, the advice and menus of cooks present, the wisdom of cookbook writers.”

Laurie Colwin is an approachable cook and writer. This books was funny, honest, and relatable.

As a home cook, writer and introvert, I felt kinship when she said, “For the socially timid, the kitche is the place to be. At least, it is a place to start.” I still struggle being in crowds and at parties you will find me circling the throngs or hiding in the kitchen trying to lend a hand. There is not the pressure to make conversation when you are busy cooking or prepping. Colwin gains confidence as she journeys from kitchens of her youth making pb & j for college activists to small dinner parties after college to full-blown catering events later on. She finds her rhythm in cooking what she likes to eat.

A couple of other lines from the book really resonated with me.

“We live in a decade that worships speed: fast food, one-minute managers, sixty minute gourmets, three minute miles. We lace up our running shoes and dash off to get on the fast track.”

When my kids were still at home and we were shuffling between sports, homework, enrichment activities and jobs, I always lamented how sped up everything felt. Like we were on this constant wheel of making sure we budgeted our time so we could fit everything in. Even though Colwin published this in 1988, it still feels relevant. Coronavirus has forced a slow down and more time at home, but our trajectory as a society is still fast-paced. We are more of an instant gratification society than we were even in the 80s and 90s. I hope that this time of sheltering in place teaches us something about appreciation of slowing down and connecting with those we love, but I think the jury is still out.

One thing that has solidified for me in all this time at home is the need for comfort. Colwin writes poetically about the perfection of a simple bowl of lentil soup when you are feeling sad, sick, or just lonely. Comforting simple food has been out of vogue for a while as chefs play with techniques and ingredients, but I think there is something nourishing for the soul about a recipe that does not take hours or crazy shopping at specialty stores. Colwin writes about what we want when we are exhausted by life, and it is not complicated food.

“When life is hard and the day has been long, the ideal dinner is not the perfect four course,…but rather something comforting and savory…something that makes one feel, if even for only a minute, that one is safe.” Safe sounds good.

I think the appeal of this book for me is its honest reality. Colwin talks openly about her fears, failures, weird food obsessions, and the needs of an aging body. I probably will never make any of the recipes in this slim volume, but I loved traveling along with Colwin as she told the story of her journey with food and writing.

 

Tools for the Freelance Writer

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I have been at this for a few months now, and picked up some tips that make life for a freelance writer much easier. When I went into this I thought it would just be writing, submitting, editing, writing. I was wrong. There are all of those things, but there is also this looming issue of social media hanging over you. As a 47 year old woman, social media is still somewhat a mystery to me. I am maybe more savvy than some, but def not an expert. There is so much controversy over whether a platform is important to getting publishing deals, and if you blog like me, you want readers and followers, so unless you have a teenager in the house willing to teach you, you need to learn how to navigate the waters of self-promotion.

The paradox I have encountered in this world so far is to get an entry level writing job, you must provide links to published pieces. But to get published pieces, you must have an entry writing job. It really is damned if you do, damned if you don’t. I think this is why so many writers take on work as unpaid interns, or agree to contracts where they are paid through social promotion, and portfolio building.

Add to this we are currently in a moment where publishing houses, magazines, and writing gigs in general are cutting way back. Which means the market is flooded with writers looking for work. It is interesting to be starting this career during a pandemic.


Here are a few sites and apps I have found really useful:

Canva

For those without graphic design software, this is a game changer. Back in my teaching days I had the whole Adobe Creative Suite, but since going solo I am getting creative about finding free alternatives. Canva can be used on your phone or computer and it makes creating a post for any social media easy. There are thousands of free templates that you can customize to your needs. It is more limited than InDesign, but it is also free. Once I started using it to create beautiful posts, I noticed how many other influencers were using it as well. It will up your social media presence, just make sure you customize it so you don’t start looking like everybody else.

Temi

One part of my recent intern job has been author interviews. Temi is a godsend! The first interview I transcribed, I did by ear. It took me three days of listening, typing, going back and listening again, editing, and on and on. It was excruciating. And that was with an author who spoke loudly, clearly, and without accent. My editor turned me on to Temi. Sign up is easy, and they offer a free trial for the first transcription. After that it is….per minute. Even though it is not free, it is indispensable for transcription. The quality is excellent and the in document editing options are very approachable. I finished an interview transcription with an author who spoke at very low volume with a strong accent in just a couple hours. the interview itself was one hour.

Voice Recorder on PC

This seems like a low-jack solution to record, and it is, but I came to it after various apps failed me. Obviously, if you are doing an in-person interview, use your voice memo option on your phone. But, as we shelter in place, interviews are happening more frequently over the phone. I tried NoNotes first, and was sorely disappointed. The sound quality is poor, and I did not realize there were only 30 minutes of free trial. It cut me off in the midst of an interview- really embarrassing. The transcription of that portion of the call was also poor. I probably should have researched the app more, but my editor told me to use it, so I did. After the cut-off, I called the author back, apologized profusely, and recorded the rest of the convo with my phone on speaker and my computer voice recording on. The quality was really good- much louder and clearer than NoNotes. It also easily downloaded to a file I could feed into Temi. Sometimes the simplest solutions are the best.

Instagram

I got some good advice about how to use Insta from some other writer friends. It is a great venue to introduce yourself, your life, what you care about, what you are reading & writing to a large audience through image-driven content. I try to do this- though I am still learning. I create posts through Canva or on my own and try to post daily. Sometimes it is not as often, but I at least repost other’s content daily through IG Stories. Also, make sure you get a business account. This allows you to see analytics. Many people in my writing community are bookstagrammers. They read and review books and post about them on IG. They also post challenges, stack shots, and other windows into their reading world. My writing centers mostly on food as a lens for social & political commentary so I post lots of food pics, and links to my food blogs. I also follow chefs, restaurants, and other food writers to stay active in the community I write in. With Insta, image is the king. Make sure you have beautiful photos, a pithy caption, and hashtags that don’t look spammy. I always search “Best Hashtags” for whatever I am posting and add my hashtags in the comment section so they do not crowd up my post.

Twitter

I use Twitter to post about my daily writing, connect with authors and publishers, and participate in writing/publishing challenges. I follow writers I admire. I comment on their posts, even if they do not comment back. I engage with those who comment on my posts. I try to use it as a platform to build my writing community. I have found other online writing groups through Twitter that I will discuss in my next post. For me, Twitter is all about the writing and connecting to other writers.

Facebook

I have to say I came late to this one. I eschewed FB for years because of the rampant bias in ads and the unrestrained running commentary about everything from politics to going to the bathroom. I started being more active since freelancing. There are some great groups for writers that offer supportive feedback and a community when face-to-face is not an option. Also, my blog following has grown the most through FB. If you are trying to grow platform, I don’t think you can ignore FB, especially if you are a middle-aged writer like me.

Snapseed

Let me start by saying, I love Adobe Lightroom & Photoshop. If money was no object, I would certainly use them. But, as a mostly unpaid, entry-level writer, money counts. Snapseed was suggested to me by a photographer friend who uses it regularly with phone pics. I love it. The “looks” edit is pretty straightforward- lighting and colorwash. The “tools” are less approachable. The app gives you the ability to do many of the edits you do in LR or PS like white balance adjustment, curves, perspective correction etc. But, like in Adobe there is a learning curve. There are lots of great tutorials here. Once you become comfortable with Snapseed’s robust capabilities, photo editing will be fun and seamless. I have had many comments on photos I edited with Snapseed, and it made my blog posts much more attractive.

Pexels

Sometimes you don’t have a fantastic image to go with your blog post or social media. It happens. I have found Pexels library of free photos a lifesaver on those occasions. There is an easy search bar that leads to hundreds of high quality images within the topic you are searching. If you have some great content you want to get out, but no images to go with it, do yourself a favor and give Pexel a look. Images are really important no matter what your are posting. In fact, the image at the top of this post is from Pexels just as an example.


Here are ways to get those coveted ARCs (Advanced Reader Copies, digital and physical), if book reviews are part of your repertoire:

Net Galley

Let me first say, I prefer print books. I have tried for years to make the jump to digital reading, and my brain just doesn’t like it. But, sometimes you cannot get a physical ARC of that book you really want to read and review. Enter Net Galley. I have received ARCs through Goodreads, from publicity agents directly, but Net Galley makes it easy to request titles you genuinely want to read. You must sign up for an account, create a profile, and agree to review the books you receive. I have gotten all the books I requested thus far, but I am picky and only request books I know will be hard to get physical copies of. If you enjoy digital reading, this is a treasure trove of great titles in all genres.

Publisher Sites

You have to do a little research to find the publishing house and imprint the book you want is being published under. Then you need to locate their publicity contact. You also need to be attractive to the publisher which entails a following on social media and your blog. I was really lucky; I established a good relationship with my local independent bookstore, Sundog Books, and not only have they given me ARCs they received, but when a book I want is not being released for a while, they give me the contact to request an ARC. Moral of the story is that relationships matter. Build your following through organic conversation online, and develop those in-person ties to people who love books as much as you.

Novel Knight lays everything out about requesting ARCs very clearly, including an email template on this blog post.


These have all been helpful for me as I work to establish my voice in the writing world, but it is also important for writers to find their people. Next post I will write about establishing a community, and finding ways to hold yourself accountable to writing every day.

 

World Travel: An Irreverent Guide by Anthony Bourdain Review

Bourdain cover

The cover (which depicts Bourdain outside a Paris café) was illustrated by Tony Millionaire, who also drew illustrations for each chapter.

“All of us, when we travel, look at the places we go, the things we see, through different eyes. And how we see them is shaped by our previous lives, the books we’ve read, the films we’ve seen, the baggage we carry.” Anthony Bourdain

A little over two years after his death, Anthony Bourdain is still teaching us about tasting and traveling with an open mind and fervent curiosity. As the month of his birth and death, June is considered a month to honor Bourdain and his legacy. My social media feeds have been filled with tributes to him by fellow chefs, journalists, and friends. His legacy is long-reaching in its impact on how we eat, how we travel, and what we value. His last book project will be hitting the shelves in October. It is billed as a travel guide, but for me, it read more like a love letter from Bourdain to all the places that changed him as an eater and person throughout his life. Written with his longtime assistant Laurie Woolever, the writer who also co-authored his last cookbook Appetites, it’s called World Travel: An Irreverent Guide. 

“Maybe the world could use another travel guide, full of Tony’s acid wit and thoughtful observations and a few sly revelations of the mysterious contours of his battered heart, stitched together from all the brilliant and hilarious things he’d said and written about the world as he saw it.” Laurie Woolever

Do not buy this book to use as a travel guide. Buy this book to, just for a moment, immerse yourself once again in Bourdain’s gorgeously unapologetic prose. If you are familiar with his shows, you have heard this material before. That does not make it less impactful. Bourdain’s casual use of expletives and reverence for place and ingredients jump off the page. The best part for me though, was the inclusion of personal essays that give insight into Bourdain and his life. These interruptions to the narrative reveal the impact Bourdain had on the people in his life.

“Lyon brought out Tony’s softness. Lyon likes to see itself as “the gastronomical capital of the world,” and, whether justified or not, there is no question that the city takes its food very seriously. This is what humbled Tony, the city’s reverence for the meal.” Bill Buford on Lyon with Tony

“We got the food bug, the travel bug, and the understanding that you could hang out with people from foreign countries, and learn things, and take pleasure in coming to understand them. This is where it all started.” Christopher Bourdain on their first trip to France

“Through my work, I’m developing creative content that’s centered on Korean culture. Everything I do is through that lens now. Tony was the person who unlocked that for me. He helped me realize what I want to do as a creative person, and as a person, period. He fundamentally changed me. Thank you, Tony.” Nari Kye

These are some words from a few of the essays, but a picture of Anthony Bourdain begins to emerge from these snippets. He was generous. He was respectful of traditions. He was adventurous from an early age. He also recognized his position as teller of the stories of the places he traveled to and acknowledged his privilege and responsibility to get it right. The book reveals the tremendous research Bourdain did before each location. It is filled with bits of history and politics of places such as Kenya where he outlines the nascent days of hunter-gatherers, to the oppressive British Colonialism, finally to the burgeoning middle class and multilingual professional sector. Each country and city highlighted has this backstory information, but also offers advice on where to stay, where to eat, and what to do while there. The book does cover places Bourdain went for his shows, but also contains updated information on all of the restaurants, hotels, and off-the-beaten-path places.

I bookmarked some of these stops for my own future travels. Like his insight on hotels in France…

  • “Me, I always stay at L’Hotel in the Saint-Germain-des-Prés. A very discreet joint known for being a love shack to the tragically hip for ages. Even more important, it has the necessary distinction of having had famous people die there. In 1900, the author Oscar Wilde kicked the bucket in room 16. . . . This was his last base of operations for a legendary three-year bender that ended badly.” With that description how can you not check in here?

Or this nugget on how to get around in London…

  • “Something you should know—never take a minicab, only black cabs. Black cabs have a meter. You know how much you’re paying. Plus, not only do they know where they’re going, but they know alternate ways to get there. Minicabs, they pretty much charge whatever the hell they like, and the likelihood that they know where they’re going is remote in the extreme.” 

And to seal the deal on his greatness, he has bookstore recommendations. My bookish heart is full, and can’t wait to check this spot out.

  • “It’s not all beef, muscle cars, and classic cocktails in LA. There’s a particular pleasure to be found at Book Soup…Their every shelf is personally curated by the well-read staff. They have an amazing and esoteric collection of unsurpassed LA-related weirdness. A great and rare pocket of wonderful and strange and beautiful. And they’re a major stopover for all the heavy-hitting authors to read.” 

Then he hit me with a spot in Georgia close to my heart, The Clermont Lounge. It is seedy. It is dark. It is a stripclub. It is  must-do when in Atlanta. Bourdain thought so too…

  • “The best, the finest, the most uniquely weird and wonderful beloved Atlanta institution, is the Clermont Lounge. This place should be a national landmark. The most beloved institution in the entire city, a place of Renaissance-era beauty and erotic and sophisticated nightlife, where the shots flow out in tiny, plastic cups. It’s not like other strip clubs. It’s operating on a whole other level.” 

As fun as this guide is, there is a greater message to Bourdain’s words and life. He knew he was the voice for the cultures he visited and he took his role as their storyteller seriously. He recognized he may be the only voice these stories may have. He acknowledged this perhaps best in an interview with CNN about the Kenya episode of Parts Unknown, “Who gets to tell the stories? This is a question asked often. The answer, in this case, for better or for worse, is, ‘I do.’ At least this time out. I do my best. I look. I listen. But in the end, I know: it’s my story, not Kamau’s, not Kenya’s, or Kenyans’. Those stories are yet to be heard.”

Anthony Bourdain offered us a view into places and people many of us will never see up close. He allowed us into his private world of exploration. He irrevocably changed the way we tell stories about food and travel.

Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

 

Query Shark and Other Thoughts

I’ve blathered a little about queries for the last couple of weeks, but the subject demands mention of the Query Shark, and then I’ll have self-actualized on the subject and can move on. Query Shark is the superhero identity of the mild-mannered metropolitan literary agent, Janet Reid. She’s well-known and respected in the publishing world, […]

via Query Shark and Other Thoughts — In A Tale-Spin

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I have heard tell of the mythical Query Shark, Janet Reid, and was delighted to find links to her infamous blog and website in this post. Again JJ is passing on some pretty important information for authors out there getting ready to query.

I spent a great deal of time reading through the Query Shark’s blog posts- especially the critiqued query letters…so informative. I also signed up for her newsletter which I have come to view as invaluable. You can sign up here.

Once you dip your feet in there, you should head straight to her FAQs page. She has an espoused love of Taylor Branch works. Unfortunately, that is not my WIP. It did lead me to the blog where you can elect to send a query letter that gets posted on the site and critiqued, but you can also pay for a private critique of a query letter and pages. The link to see how this works is here. It helps tremendously if you read the things she directs you to read because I found out “Is your query for non-fiction, or memoir? If so, don’t send. I’ll just email you saying I don’t post those kinds of queries on QS,” and will not waste my time with the public query option.

Ultimately, this site, and all the guidance provided for FREE from Janet Reid is worth your time. If you are an author getting ready to query, don’t waste your time blindly sending out letters. Even if you go buy the Writer’s Market (I did), research all the comp books in your genre (I did), and research your chosen agent’s likes and dislikes to include (I did), it won’t help without a rockstar query letter. You have probably spent a good portion of your time and tears (I did) crafting this manuscript…give yourself the best shot to land an agent who will love your work and help it find a publishing home.

Stealing Buddha’s Dinner by Bich Minh Nguyen

Stealing Buddha's Dinner cover

“We are people without a country…Until we walk out of that gate…And then we are American.”

I want to write like Bich Minh Nguyen. Her memoir, Stealing Buddha’s Dinner is gorgeous in its detail, but economical in its language. Nguyen addresses the push and pull of the immigrant experience. Many refugees come to these shores escaping horrific conditions in their home environment. Nguyen is no different – she escapes Vietnam with her father, sister, and grandmother as it fell to the Communists in 1975.

In her journey to find belonging she uses food as a metaphor for identity, “Real people ate hamburgers and casseroles and brownies. And I wanted to be a real person, or at least make others believe I was one.” Nguyen struggles to fit in as she watches her older sisters welcomed into popular circles. She blames her short stature, large glasses, and unattractive hair as she seeks solace in books. She finds friends in characters from her favorites and often cannot even haul all the books she wants from the public library.

One of the most poignant lines for me as an introverted bookish-type growing up was, “I read to be alone. I read so as not to be alone.” It made me remember all those times I would climb the tree in my backyard with my latest book and lose myself in that world. I found friends in Bilbo Baggins and Jo march. I found peace in their lives away from my own.

I picked this book up for two reasons. First, I was writing an essay for Write or Die Tribe about the Intersections of Food Writing & Race. You can check the article out here. Second, I was accepted to the Key West Literary Seminar & Workshops, and specifically to Nguyen’s memoir workshop. I wanted to read her work before we started working on mine.

I really loved this book. Even though it is a memoir about a Vietnamese refugee trying to find her place in America, it felt personal. Every awkward little girl is looking for belonging, and can find a kindred soul in Bich.

Query Letter Examples & Advice

I wrote last week about the need and purpose of query letters — to get an agent for your masterpiece. This time I have a good article by Robert Lee Brewer at Writer’s Digest, which explains a little more about the query concept and also gives good examples of query letters that were successful in […]

via Query Letter Examples — In A Tale-Spin

More sage advice on querying from In A Tale Spin…check out the previous post here.

Query letters are such a daunting task. You must do the research. You must find who is publishing your type of book, who the agent is within that agency, and then decipher what they are looking for. I wrote one query letter about 12 years ago and was just sure I was getting an agent. I had a contact from another author. I had good feedback from beta readers. I felt confident my book was coming to fruition. I spent a long time crafting that query letter. I worked on a platform because I read that was important. I sent my query with high hopes.

Obviously, it did not work out the way I thought. I received a really nice, personal email from the agent explaining she wasn’t taking on any new manuscripts in my genre. She also offered I may need to revisit my sample chapters, and consider some revision to add tension. I was crushed.

Looking back, I see she was generous. My WIP was not ready. It was a good idea, but my writing was not there yet, and like she said, I needed some tension. It was too nostalgic, too giddy. I put it away and did not look at it for over a decade. Now I am in the thick of rewrites and restructure. I feel good about the direction, but I will not start querying until I feel it is ready. I also will send out more than one letter. Most authors I interface with say they sent anywhere from 30-100 queries. I also got some great advice about platform. Yes, they look at it, but it is not a deal breaker. It is better to have a following you grow organically, interact with regularly, and can count on wanting to read your work when it becomes public.

For now, I will keep writing.

Celebrate Caribbean Heritage Month with Books

Caribbean stack

I have a not-so-secret obsession with everything Edwidge Danticat has ever put on a page. Her words are powerful, lyrical, and envelop you in the world of Haitian Diaspora. Danticat, and other writers I love, use their writing to shed light on life in the Caribbean from foods, to culture, to colonialism, to being caught between the world of the United States and the world of the Islands, not fitting neatly into either. Below are three of my favorites from my stack.

Feast of the Goat

The Feast of the Goat by Mario Vargas Llosa

Brutal, raw, revealing, hauntingly beautiful…I read this book cover-to-cover in one 5 hour sitting. It unapologetically reveals the terror that Trujillo inflicted on the citizens of the Dominican Republic. The alternating narrators from chapter to chapter leant power to the testimony of Trujillo’s victims. Urania’s story was touching in its attention to detail as we followed her loss of innocence at Trujillo and her own father’s (a trujillista)hands. It was horrific but I couldn’t stop reading every word that Llosa carefully chose to portray her naivite, her shame and her resolve. I cheered alongside De Maza as he and his fellow conspirators plotted and carried out the Trujillo assassination. I was equally grieved as Trujillo’s son captured and tortured the men in brutal fashion for months- they only survived through injections ordered by Ramfis to keep them alive so he could continue his sadism. I even relished the chapters narrated by Trujillo himself. Llosa humanized him through his depiction of shortcomings and fears. Trujillo was not just the dictator who never sweated and showed no remorse. Llosa gives the reader all of Trujillo from his growing up to his battle with prostate cancer, but though it made him believable, his evil permeated and was inescapable.

Farming of the Bones

 

The Farming of the Bones by Edwidge Danticat

Danticat’s voice is haunting in this tale from a turbulent time between Haiti and the Dominican Republic. The raw passion between Sebastian and Amabelle as they find solace in each other amidst the struggles of the cane fields and plantation work is palpable. I am still churning over the unfinished ending to the poignant story.

 

The Dew Breaker

The Dew Breaker by Edwidge Danticat

The vignette, “The Water Child” especially spoke to me. One of the most telling motifs in the chapter is the lack of voice. First we have the reference Ms. Hinds makes about the basenji. Ms. Hinds explains that it is “A dog that doesn’t bark… [it just] exists.” Later in the chapter, as Ms. Hinds is getting ready to be released, lack of voice is brought up again through Nadine’s internal monologue as she discusses the struggles Ms. Hinds will face, “…the dread of being voiceless…,when she would awake from dreams in which she’d spoken to find that she had no voice, or when she would see something alarming and realize that she couldn’t scream for help, or even when she would realize that she herself was slowly forgetting,…what her own voice used to sound like.” Though Nadine is describing the experience she thinks Ms. Hinds will experience having physically lost her voice, I think this is also a representation of how Danticat sees Haitian emigrants. The Haitian Diaspora have become like the pebble floating in the water on Nadine’s shrine to her aborted baby. They are different from their surroundings and fighting to maintain their original shape as the surrounding water slowly erodes them until they become, “…the unrecognizable woman staring back at [them] from the closed elevator doors.” Each of the chapters has something to offer about the Haitian Diaspora experience but “The Water Child” is the most powerful to me and could stand on its own as a short story. Amazing book when you understand the context of Danticat’s background as a Haitian Emigrant.

 

Beginner’s Guide To The Query Letter — In A Tale-Spin

Writers write. A pretty basic philosophy, but, sadly, there’s more to it than that. Writing is really all most of us want to do, and then have that writing appear out in the world and bring a nice dose of appreciation and fulfillment…and yes, even a little fame and fortune would be quite acceptable. The […]

via Beginner’s Guide To The Query Letter — In A Tale-Spin

I am not at this point yet, but query letters and the submission process in general, is daunting. I like what this gentleman has been writing about the arduous undertaking of researching and locating the right agent with the right query letter for your manuscript.

Low Carb Stuffed Peppers

Still at this remake recipes into a healthier version initiative. I love stuffed peppers- the roasted, smoky taste of the pepper filled with a bounty of seasonal veggies diced small, hearty ground lamb, homemade tomato sauce all topped with a crispy layer of melty cheese on top. Delicious. But, not the most healthy option for dinner. This week I took one of my fave versions of stuffed peppers (inspired by Food52), and made some swap-outs to make it less carby and fatty.

As with any of my recipes, you could sub whatever protein you like- tofu, ground beef, ground chicken- whatever suits you. The big game changer is swapping out the orzo for cauliflower rice. I am not here to say cauliflower rice is the tastiest thing in the world, but like other foodstuffs, it adopts the flavors you pair it with. Really it just becomes another veggie that serves to bulk up your dish. Also, I use halloumi cheese (highly rec if you have not tried), but an easy switch is bulb mozzarella. This recipe makes 3 full peppers.

Stuffed Pep 1

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1/2 pound ground turkey
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided, plus more to taste
  • cloves garlic, minced
  • medium white onion, diced
  • (14.5-oz) can diced fire-roasted tomatoes
  • 10 ounces riced cauliflower
  • 1/4 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1/4 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 3 bell peppers (I used yellow)
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup roughly chopped parsley leaves, loosely packed
  • 8 ounces halloumi cheese, cut into ½ inch dice
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

Instructions

  • Add the canola oil to a large skillet and set over medium heat. When the oil begins to shimmer, add the ground turkey and season with ½ teaspoon of salt. Let the turkey cook undisturbed for about 30 seconds to develop some caramelization, then break the meat into small crumbles.
  • Add the onion and another ¼ teaspoon of salt. Cook the onion and turkey together for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring regularly. When the onion begin caramelize, add the garlic, and cook until the garlic is fragrant.
  • Add the tomatoes (including their juice) and another ¼ teaspoon of salt, and the riced cauliflower. The water content from the content will cook off as you continue to saute. Once liquid has reduced and riced cauliflower is combined with mixture, turn off heat.
  • Heat the oven to 450°F. Cut the peppers in half lengthwise. Use a paring knife or spoon to remove all seeds, and trim white pith inside the pepper. Arrange the peppers cut-side up on a rimmed sheet pan lined with foil. Drizzle the peppers with olive oil and season each one with a pinch of salt. Roast for 25 minutes.
  • While those are in the oven, roughly chop the parsley and add to the turkey mixture, along with the halloumi and lemon juice. Stir to combine, then taste and adjust with more salt as necessary.
  • Remove the peppers from the oven after they have roasted for 25 minutes. Evenly divide the filling between the roasted peppers. Return the sheet pan to the oven, and cook for 15 minutes, until the peppers look slightly charred and the cheese is melty.

Stuffed Pep 2

I had a fair amount of filling left. I put it in some tupperware and for the next two days heated up the filling and cooked an over easy egg to put on top. It made the perfect breakfast, and I think the runny yolk added even more dimension to an already delicious dish!

Check out some of my other healthy dinner remakes:

Cauliflower Pizza

Zucchini Rollatini